Back to Blog
June 1, 2019
James Setton

The Benefits of Swimming: Understanding the Muscles Used

Swimming is one of the best forms of exercise, as it provides an excellent cardio workout while also engaging multiple muscle groups. This low-impact activity is perfect for people of all ages, and it can help you improve your overall health and fitness. But what muscles are used in swimming, and how does each swimming stroke affect different muscle groups?

Front Crawl Swimming: Muscles Used and Benefits

The front crawl, also known as freestyle, is the fastest swimming stroke and works several muscle groups simultaneously. This stroke targets the latissimus dorsi, trapezius, and rhomboids in the upper back, as well as the pectoralis major and minor muscles in the chest. The deltoids, biceps, triceps, and forearm muscles are also engaged during the front crawl, making it an effective full-body workout.

Breaststroke Swimming: Muscles Used and Benefits

The breaststroke is a slower, more controlled stroke that targets the chest and back muscles. It engages the pectoralis major and minor muscles in the chest, as well as the latissimus dorsi, trapezius, and rhomboids in the upper back. The quadriceps, hamstrings, and calf muscles are also used during this stroke, which makes it an excellent lower body workout.

Swimming Backstroke: Muscles Used and Benefits

The swimming backstroke is similar to the front crawl in terms of muscle engagement, as it targets the latissimus dorsi, trapezius, and rhomboids in the upper back, as well as the deltoids, biceps, triceps, and forearm muscles. The main difference is that the backstroke engages these muscles in a different way, as you’re swimming on your back rather than your stomach. This stroke is also a great way to improve your posture and strengthen your core muscles.

Swimmer’s Muscle Anatomy: Understanding the Muscles Used in Swimming

In addition to the major muscle groups mentioned above, swimming also engages several other muscle groups that are essential for proper form and technique. These include the glutes, which are used to stabilize the hips and legs during the breaststroke and backstroke, as well as the abs and obliques, which help to maintain a straight and stable body position during all swimming strokes.

Final words

Swimming is an excellent form of exercise that engages multiple muscle groups and provides a low-impact workout for people of all ages. Whether you prefer the front crawl, backstroke, breaststroke, or any other swimming stroke, you can be sure that you’re getting a full-body workout that will help you improve your strength, flexibility, and overall health. So the next time you hit the pool, remember to focus on proper form and technique to get the most out of your swimming workout.

Guest article

The above may not coincide with the methodology and opinion of the SwimRight Academy Team.

James Setton
Comments (0)
Comment

Your comment